Robert Morgan Creates the Ah Ha! Fest

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Robert Morgan Creates the Ah Ha! Fest

Robert Morgan holds posters his creative writing students created to advertise for the Ah Ha! Fest.

Robert Morgan holds posters his creative writing students created to advertise for the Ah Ha! Fest.

Robert Morgan holds posters his creative writing students created to advertise for the Ah Ha! Fest.

Robert Morgan holds posters his creative writing students created to advertise for the Ah Ha! Fest.

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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal (SMBC) is among the pages Robert Morgan, a CHS English teacher, views almost every morning. “SMBC updates everyday which I think is amazing because some of the comics are quite long as well, but he’s got a blistering pace of production,” Morgan said.  Morgan has been reading SMBC since high school but now he realizes that comics are more than people wearing their underwear over their clothes.          

Weinersmith is the creator of  SMBC and the Bah Fest, a celebration of well-argued and incorrect scientific theories that takes place in multiple locations around the globe. A festival similar to this took   place in one of the daily comics published on Jan. 12, 2013. The comic was of a woman arguing that babies are hairless so they could be thrown farther and genes could be spread as far as possible. This comic was the inspiration for the Bah Fest.

Morgan is a fan of the Bah Fest, and he created the ‘AH HA!’ Fest, a Community High version of the Bah Fest. AH HA! Fest stands for the Ad Hoc High School Festival. Morgan emailed back and forth with Weinersmith about setting up a smaller scale version of the festival.  Weinersmith promised to give a free signed comic book to the winner.  

The two blocks of creative writing at CHS are taught by Morgan. Every student created a slideshow and a speech to sell their idea to their audiences. Within each block there was an even smaller version of the contest. The class then voted and the top three from block seven and the top four from block one went to the school-wide competition. The competitors were Eva Rosenfeld, Josh Krauth-Harding, Fin Seely and Liam Knight, Aaron Williette and Tyler Schmader, Noe Barrell and Alec Neff and Simon Rutkowski.

The goal was to show the rest of the school what the creative writers did and get other departments involved. Morgan’s students in his creative writing classes created posters that were put up around the school to spread news of the ‘AH HA!’ Fest.

On Tuesday, Oct. 13 the Craft Theatre at Community High School was set up with a projector, microphone, and a judges table for the competition. Around 1:50 the theatre started filling up with forums. Students sat on the floor, on a ledge, and on chairs set on the perimeter of the theatre. Courtney Kiley, CHS science teacher, Anne Thomas, CHS math teacher, Liz Stern, CHS science teacher and a guest judge from the University of Michigan were there judging the competition.

Seely presented her reasoning for why dogs aren’t ticklish, Rosenfeld explained why bushes were so short, Krauth-Harding proved that black holes do indeed exist and Knight told everyone why bacon tastes so good. From seventh block, Willette and Schmader worked together to prove that Donald Rumpsfeld is a lizard, Barrell and Neff explained why genitals are between the legs and Rutkowski presented the psychological reason earthworms are shaped like snakes.

The ‘AH HA!’ Fest went on for about one hour and the judges had a tough choice to make at the end. Krauth-Harding, the winner of the contest, spoke about black holes. He argued that black holes do exist and that is where socks go when they go missing. We cannot explore the black holes or send drones into them but they do indeed exist according to Krauth-Harding.