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Restaurant Tour Guide of Ann Arbor: Sadako

Sadako is worth finding.
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Emmy Chung

Arguably one of the best hidden sushi spots in Ann Arbor, Sadako is located on South University avenue. Sadako is a Japanese restaurant and serves a variety of lunch and dinner options, including bento boxes, udon noodles and bowls.

Although the restaurant itself is small, they have quick and efficient service. One of the best parts about Sadako is the miso soup that comes complimentary with some dishes. This soup is light and pairs well with other flavors.

I ordered The Sadako Crunch Roll—just one of the many ‘crunch’ rolls featured on the menu. Crunch rolls usually contain tempura shrimp, avocado, and fried tempura flakes; they aren’t a part of traditional Japanese sushi but they are a delicious addition to regular sushi. This roll consisted of avocado and crab salad topped with crunch and special sauce. The avocado was fresh tasting and the sauce added an element of sweetness to combat the saltiness in each bite.

Sadako offers a variety of non-traditional sushi rolls, including a sweet banana roll, Philadelphia roll, and Mexican roll. Sticking to the basics, I also tried the Tempura Shrimp Roll—made up of fried shrimp, thinly sliced cucumber and crab. This roll has a solid flavor on its own and tastes even better when accompanied by ginger and soy sauce.

Although you might not think to try this dish, the Agedashi Tofu is a pleasant surprise and makes for a great appetizer. Served in a bowl of dashi broth, this crispy deep fried tofu is old and well-known in Japan. Another delicious starter is the House Salad. The sweet and spicy ginger dressing makes up for its simplicity.

On the lunch menu, you can order ‘combos’ from the sushi bar. These combos highlight dynamic pairs of flavors such as spicy tuna and salmon. If you’re looking for variety, a bento box is another option. Sadako’s bento boxes typically contain a protein such as chicken katsu or fresh water eel, four pieces of sushi, tempura vegetables and rice.

Sadako is very affordable and an overall pleasant dining experience.

 

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About the Contributor
Emmy Chung, Journalist
Emmy is going into her fifth semester on the Communicator staff. She is excited for what the year will bring and finally being a senior! She spends most of her time playing soccer, which she has played since the age of six. Emmy enjoys being outside as the weather gets colder, going on long runs, and discovering new coffee shops.

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